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Brian Klaas

Telegraph

Corruptible by Brian Klaas, review: inside the minds of petty psychopaths

In his mundane job as a New York school maintenance supervisor, Steve Raucci earned the unlikely title of “the Don Corleone of janitors”. Told he could get a promotion if he cut his school’s electricity bills, he saved millions of dollars by keeping classrooms freezing cold in winter.
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lawfareblog.com

The Chatter Podcast: Power and Corruption with Brian Klaas

On this week’s episode of Chatter, David Priess speaks with political scientist and author Brian Klaas about why certain people seek power, what holding power does to them, and how to get better leaders. They discussed the nature of political research, what kind of people become rulers, corruption and system effects, and ways to keep the most corrupt people out of power--as well as meerkat signaling, a cannibalistic dictator, and Brian's new book, Corruptible: Who Gets Power and How It Changes Us.
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Richmond.com

Brian Klaas column: What happens when angry polarization takes over school boards and local government?

Why in the world would anyone enter public service in 2021?. After all, the scenes have become familiar: People shaking with rage approach the lectern. They start by berating the local school board or town council for following public health advice. Then, the conspiracy theories begin. Ordinary citizens serving their communities are accused of being part of a deep state plot or being in the service of dark, unseen paymasters.
Picture for Brian Klaas column: What happens when angry polarization takes over school boards and local government?
The Spokesman-Review

Brian Klaas: What happens when angry polarization takes over school boards and local government?

Why in the world would anyone enter public service in 2021?. After all, the scenes have become familiar: someone shaking with rage approaches the lectern. They start by berating the local school board or town council for following public health advice. Then, the conspiracy theories begin. Ordinary citizens serving their communities are accused of being part of a deep state plot or being in the service of dark, unseen paymasters. And then, after the microphones and the lights are switched off, some come home to death threats in their email inboxes or on their voicemails. They fear for their safety.
KANSAS STATE
Keene Sentinel

We're sleepwalking toward a cyber 9/11, by Brian Klaas

In early February, an unknown hacker or team of hackers remotely accessed the software that manages the water supply in Oldsmar, Fla. They attempted to inject huge amounts of lye into the municipal water, which could have lethally poisoned thousands of people. That attempted attack was thwarted due to sheer...