Alice Neel

Photographyindypendent.org

Alice Neel: Painting People Left Out of the Picture

In a world that viewed portrait painting as an affectation of the rich, Alice Neel (1900-1984) believed all people had a right to have a portrait painted. On canvas, Neel depicted everyday people in a way that dignified them and viewed them as agents for change. She gave her subjects both personality and character, a feat that revealed their capacity to endure and to struggle. They are never broken or demoralized. And now we have a glorious new exhibition of more than 100 of her paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art that brings her art to life and affirms the belated recognition she has received as one of the great painters of the 20th century.
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Museumsgeorgetowner.com

Alice Neel at the Met

Alice Neel isn’t the only woman artist with a self-portrait in the National Portrait Gallery. Among the others are Elaine de Kooning — whose famous portrait of JFK is in the America’s Presidents section — and the Louises: Bourgeois and Nevelson. But apart from Ana Mendieta’s four-minute film, Neel’s is...
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New York City, NYMidland Reporter-Telegram

Alice Neel was the greatest American portraitist of the 20th century, and her work continues to astonish

NEW YORK - Days after seeing "People Come First," a career-spanning Alice Neel survey at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, an afterimage of her brisk vision of vibrant humanity still pulses behind my eyes. Even in memory, Neel's paintings never sit still. They squirm, shiver and jiggle. Particularly memorable is her astonishing sequence of tender yet frank, unidealized portraits of pregnant women, women in childbirth and women breastfeeding. Regarded cumulatively, they are one of the signal achievements of modern American art.
New York City, NYWashington Post

Alice Neel was the greatest American portraitist of the 20th century. Her work continues to astonish.

NEW YORK — Days after seeing "People Come First," a career-spanning Alice Neel survey at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, an afterimage of her brisk vision of vibrant humanity still pulses behind my eyes. Even in memory, Neel's paintings never sit still. They squirm, shiver and jiggle. Particularly memorable is her astonishing sequence of tender yet frank, unidealized portraits of pregnant women, women in childbirth and women breastfeeding. Regarded cumulatively, they are one of the signal achievements of modern American art.