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Alice Neel

48hills.org

The revolutionary realism of Alice Neel

“Alice Neel: People Come First” (through July 10 at the DeYoung Museum, SF) is a 60-year retrospective of the paintings of American communist and figurative painter Alice Neel (1900-1984). The exhibit makes its way to San Francisco after first appearing at the New York Metropolitan Museum and the Guggenheim Bilbao.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
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piedmontexedra.com

Alice Neel at de Young reveals the artist’s deep bond to her subjects

At a New York gallery in 1980, the artist Alice Neel unveiled a portrait of herself holding a paintbrush and sitting in front of a canvas while completely nude. Neel’s brave and unflinching self-portrait as a 80-year-old woman stripped to her essence reflects the direct and unsentimental way she painted the scores of people who sat before her easel over the decades: unvarnished, sometimes raw, yet always fully human. The painting is one of more than 100 works spanning the arc of Neel’s career in “Alice Neel: People Come First,” a major retrospective on view through July 10 at the de Young Museum in San Francisco.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Picture for Alice Neel at de Young reveals the artist’s deep bond to her subjects
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Alice Neel retrospective at the de Young reveals the artist’s deep connection to her portrait sitters

At a New York gallery in 1980, the artist Alice Neel unveiled a portrait of herself holding a paintbrush and sitting in front of a canvas while completely nude. Neel’s brave and unflinching self-portrait as a 80-year-old woman stripped to her essence reflects the direct and unsentimental way she painted the scores of people who sat before her easel over the decades: unvarnished, sometimes raw, yet always fully human. The painting is one of more than 100 works spanning the arc of Neel’s career in “Alice Neel: People Come First,” a major retrospective on view through July 10 at the de Young Museum in San Francisco.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Daily Californian

‘Alice Neel: People Come First’ breathes humanity into appearances

Over a dozen pairs of painted eyes stare out of a blown-up black-and-white photograph, each pair of eyes coming from a person who once sat for Alice Neel as she painted their image. Neel herself sits cross-legged in front of her many works, her eyes pointed in the same direction as her painted people, softly gazing upon each visitor as they enter “Alice Neel: People Come First.”
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
SFStation.com

Alice Neel: People Come First

Alice Neel (1900-1984) was one of the century's most radical painters, a champion of social justice whose longstanding commitment to humanist principles inspired her life as well as her art. This is the first comprehensive West Coast retrospective of Neel's work. The award-winning exhibition includes paintings, drawings, and watercolors, along with additional artworks and media exclusive to the San Francisco presentation.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
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juxtapoz.com

Esiri Erheriene-Essi: Why I Love Alice Neel

In our Spring 2022 quarterly, we have an extensive survey and conversation about the exhibition, Alice Neel: People Come First, at the de Young Museum in San Francisco opening March 12, 2022. In conjunction with the feature, we asked a few contemporary artists about the influence of Neel, as both a portrait painter and that influence today as figuration as once again become a central focal point of contemporary art.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
juxtapoz.com

A Full Embrace: Jenna Gribbon on Alice Neel

In our upcoming Spring 2022 quarterly, we have an extensive survey and conversation about the upcoming exhibition, Alice Neel: People Come First, at the de Young Museum in San Francisco opening March 12, 2022. In conjunction with the feature, we asked a few contemporary artists about the influence of Neel, as both a portrait painter and that influence today as figuration as once again become a central focal point of contemporary art. One artist we spoke with his Jenna Gribbon, currently showing in London and known for her intimate portraits of friends, family and her partner.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Hyperallergic

Alice Neel Didn’t Work Alone

Alice Neel received her first museum retrospective in 1974 at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Since then, Neel’s captivating portraits have been the subject of numerous exhibitions and publications, including the recently concluded Alice Neel: People Come First at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. As this exhibition’s title suggests, Neel’s artistic practice reflected her fundamental interest in humanity. She set out to capture not just a person’s likeness, but their character. However, beyond each subject’s unique individuality, Neel’s portraits have long been regarded as reflections of the communities of which she was a part. Why, then, do studies of Neel to date almost universally overlook her participation in the Alliance of Figurative Artists during the crucial decade of the 1970s?
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