ContributorsPublishersAdvertisers

Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei Will Curate London Exhibition of Works Created by Incarcerated People

Click here to read the full article. This fall, Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei will curate a show of works created by incarcerated people in London. The exhibition, titled “Freedom,” is organized by the Koestler Arts charity, which promotes and sells works by incarcerated people, and will open at the Southbank Center this October. It’s intended to mark the 60th anniversary of the Koestler Awards, a prize initiative honoring the artistic achievements of detainees across the U.K. criminal justice system. “Freedom” will reflect a diversity of people’s experiences with incarceration, with works created by individuals in prisons, mental health facilities, immigration detainment...
WORLD
Picture for Ai Weiwei Will Curate London Exhibition of Works Created by Incarcerated People

Ai Weiwei Gets the Big Retrospective He Deserves, For Better and For Worse

Click here to read the full article. When a 40-work survey of Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei’s art traveled from Japan to the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., a decade ago, the show drew massive crowds and made the artist a star. Earlier this year, a retrospective more than four times that show’s size opened in Vienna at the Albertina Modern to no such fanfare. What accounts for this? It’s possible we’re burnt out on Ai’s work by now, which makes sense, considering that there were four separate institutional surveys of his art last year alone. But there...
WASHINGTON, DC
Picture for Ai Weiwei Gets the Big Retrospective He Deserves, For Better and For Worse
RELATED CHANNELS

Ai Weiwei: ‘I am like a cat. Cats can play for a whole day’

Ai Weiwei, 64, must qualify by now as a grand old man of contemporary art except that as a sculptor, photographer and documentary film-maker, he is characterised by unflagging energy and youthful playfulness. As a child, he lived in a dugout in China’s “Little Siberia” where his poet father, Ai Qing, had been banished, condemned as a “rightist”. In 2011, he was “disappeared” for 81 days in a Chinese jail and then spent four years under house arrest. In 2015, he left China and has since lived in Berlin, Cambridge and Portugal. His latest show at Kettle’s Yard, The Liberty of Doubt, exhibits Chinese antiquities – bought in 2020 at a Cambridge auction sale – alongside his own work.
WORLD

Exiled artist Ai Weiwei reflects on Beijing Olympics

BEIJING (AP) — When the artist Ai Weiwei was picked to help design Beijing’s Bird’s Nest stadium for the 2008 Summer Olympics, he hoped the Games and the venue’s distinct architecture — the instantly recognizable weave of curving steel beams — would symbolize China’s new openness.
SPORTS
RELATED PEOPLE
RELATED PUBLISHERS
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE