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CDC: COVID still greater risk than vaccine to teens

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention experts said Wednesday that COVID-19 vaccines remain far less risky to youths than the disease itself, despite rare but concerning reports of heart inflammation in some teens and young adults after getting the shots. “Currently, the benefits still clearly outweigh the risks for...
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New movies: ‘Werewolves Within’ will make you laugh — and shriek

Movie theaters are clearing a path for “F9,” the latest entry in the “Fast and Furious” franchise. Wise decision. But if you’re looking for something other than that hot-roddin’ hit, here are alternatives that include some that debuted at the recent Tribeca Film Festival, one that’s streaming via the Frameline film festival, and a horror/comedy that works on both counts. There’s even a rom-com that’s not your average rom-com on Netflix. Read on.
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Unvaccinated Missourians are the COVID ‘canary’

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — As the U.S. emerges from the COVID-19 crisis, Missouri is becoming a cautionary tale for the rest of the country: It is seeing an alarming rise in cases because of a combination of the fast-spreading delta variant and stubborn resistance among many people to getting vaccinated.
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REAL ID fee will be waived for Californians who renewed license during pandemic

The fee for a REAL ID will be waived for the rest of the year for Californians who got a driver’s license during the pandemic, the Department of Motor Vehicles says. Because a REAL ID requires an office visit, many drivers who needed to renew a license after February 2020 got a regular license through the online process. The free upgrade will allow them to switch to REAL ID without paying another fee ($38 for most drivers).
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Covid-19 vaccine boosters may be necessary. Here’s what you need to know

Vaccine makers are preparing for a next possible phase of the Covid-19 vaccine rollout: booster doses. Currently three coronavirus vaccines are authorized for emergency use in the United States — the two-dose Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for people 12 and older, the two-dose Moderna vaccine and the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccines for everyone 18 and older.
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How COVID-19 can damage the brain

Stanford researchers have found signs of inflammation, genetic changes and impaired circuitry in the brains of people killed by COVID-19, important clues to the mysterious “brain fog” and mental struggles reported by many patients. The research also reveals haunting similarities between the brains of those killed by COVID and other...
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Opinion: Stop deporting essential workers who keep America running

Americans have a moral and economic imperative to pass the Citizenship for Essential Workers Act, which would provide a pathway to citizenship for the roughly 5 million people living here illegally who risked their lives on the COVID-19 front lines to keep the United States functioning. About 74% of undocumented...
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Why do so many Los Angeles cops refuse COVID vaccines? Politics, conspiracy theories, distrust, chief says

Only around half of Los Angeles Police Department employees have received at least one vaccine dose protecting them against COVID-19, the chief of police said Tuesday. That rate lags far behind the general public — as of last week, 67% of L.A. County residents have had at least one dose, according to the most recent numbers from the Department of Public Health. At least 58% were fully vaccinated.
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SF Opera returns to live performances in August with ‘Tosca’

San Francisco Opera is coming back big for the 2021-22 season, the company’s first return to live performance since COVID-19 brought music to a halt at the start of 2020. A season-opening “Tosca,” a bold new production of Beethoven’s “Fidelio,” and the continuation of the company’s multi-year Mozart-Da Ponte trilogy with new stagings of “Cosi fan tutte” and “Don Giovanni” are some of the highlights of the company’s 99th season, announced June 22 by general director Matthew Shilvock.
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Report: Almost 900 Secret Service agents got COVID

WASHINGTON — Roughly 900 U.S. Secret Service employees tested positive for the coronavirus, according to government records obtained by a government watchdog group. Secret Service records show that 881 people on the agency payroll were diagnosed with COVID-19 between March 1, 2020 and March 9, 2021, according to documents obtained by Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. More than 11% of Secret Service employees were infected.
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Delta variant appears to be behind Missouri case surge

Health officials are pouring their effort into convincing those still hesitant to get vaccinated against Covid-19, but none of the strategies appear to be a “Hail Mary pass” to get the US to reach President Joe Biden’s vaccination goal and curb spreading variants. “I just don’t know if there’s something...
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As passengers return to air travel, bad behavior skyrockets

Air travel can be difficult in the best of times, with cramped planes, screaming babies, flight delays and short tempers. Throw in a pandemic, and the anxiety level can rise quickly. That has led to confrontations with flight attendants and other unruly behavior, including occasional fights that get captured and...
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Niles: 5 challenges still facing Disneyland and other theme parks

Now that capacity restrictions have gone away across the country, what are the next great challenges facing the theme park industry as it looks to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic?. Staffing: Theme parks are not alone in scrambling to hire workers. Unprecedented demand for labor as businesses reopen has given...
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Many Bay Area residents feel free keeping their masks on

SAN JOSE — As the Bay Area snaps back to life with almost all pandemic restrictions now in the rearview mirror, residents can’t seem to shake off the mask-wearing habit. When the state fully reopened last Tuesday, allowing vaccinated people to go out to restaurants, gyms, movie theaters and bowling alleys without face coverings for the first time in more than a year, many who viewed masks as a necessary evil greeted the news with a welcome sigh of relief.