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Scientists find 16 drugs that could treat COVID-19

In a new study from the CEU Cardenal Herrera University, researchers found a new way to identify existing medicines that could be applied to treat COVID-19. This mathematical model can compare the three-dimensional structure of the target proteins of known medicines to SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus proteins. In the case of COVID-19,...
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Scientists Discover a Novel Defense Mechanism Against the COVID-19 Coronavirus

Scientists from Hokkaido University have discovered a novel defensive response to SARS-CoV-2 that involves the viral pattern recognition receptor RIG-I. Upregulating expression of this protein could strengthen the immune response in COPD patients. In the 18 months since the first report of COVID-19 and the spread of the pandemic, there...
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Tiny capsules containing cannabinoids could help treat neurological disorders

A team of researchers led by Curtin University has discovered a new way to improve the absorption rate of medicinal cannabis when taken orally, which could potentially be used to treat neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injuries in the future. Published in the journal...
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Researchers discover drugs to fight SARS-CoV-2

Seoul [South Korea], June 21 (ANI): Researchers from Yonsei University in South Korea have found that certain commensal bacteria that reside in the human intestine produce compounds that inhibit SARS-CoV-2. The research was presented at the World Microbe Forum, an online meeting of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the...
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Scientists create new straw as an ‘instant cure for hiccups’

Scientists have created a cure for hiccups that doesn’t involve people ridiculously screaming “boo!” or holding your nose while chugging water. The “HiccAway” a “forced inspiratory suction and swallow tool”, is an L-shaped straw with an adjustable pressure valve on one end, according to the Guardian. Sipping water out of this rigid straw will immediately cure the hiccups for most people. It costs $14.
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Tiny cannabis capsules could help treat neurological diseases

A team of researchers led by Curtin University has discovered a new way to improve the absorption rate of medicinal cannabis when taken orally, which could potentially be used to treat neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injuries in the future. Published in the journal...
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Could a fungus-derived compound reduce hyperinflammation in severe COVID-19?

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), continues to spread worldwide. To date, over 177.13 million cases have been reported, and over 3.8 million have lost their lives. Finding effective treatments that can mitigate severe disease remains a crucial area of scientific research.
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For Transplant Recipients, A Third COVID Vaccine Dose May Offer Better Protection

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say study findings suggest booster doses should be investigated for those who are immunocompromised. In a study published on June 15, 2021, in the Annals of Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they believe that, for the first time, there is evidence to show that three doses of vaccine increase antibody levels against SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID 19 — more than the standard two-dose regimen for people who have received solid organ transplants.
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Tiny Cannabis Capsules Could Help Treat Alzheimer’s, MS, and TBI

Summary: A newly developed cannabidiol capsule can be absorbed by the body faster and penetrate the brain more quickly in mouse models of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and TBI. Source: Curtin University. A team of researchers led by Curtin University has discovered a new way to...
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Previous Covid infection may not offer long-term protection, study finds

Previous infection with coronavirus does not necessarily protect against Covid in the longer term, especially when caused by new variants of concern, a study on healthcare workers suggests. Researchers at Oxford University found marked differences in the immune responses of medical staff who contracted Covid, with some appearing far better...
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Researchers identify 16 medicines that could be used to treat COVID-19

In the scientific journal Pharmaceutics, researchers from the ESI International Chair of the CEU Cardenal Herrera University (CEU UCH) and ESI Group have just published a new computational topology strategy to identify existing medicines that could be applied to treat COVID-19 without waiting for the research and clinical trial phases required to develop a new medicine. This mathematical model applies topologic data analysis in a pioneering way in order to compare the three-dimensional structure of the target proteins of known medicines to SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus proteins such as protein NSP12, an enzyme in charge of replicating the viral RNA.
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New COVID-19 approach exploits protein response in human cells to combat virus

The development of COVID-19 drugs such as Gilead Sciences’ Veklury (remdesivir) has mostly focused on directly targeting the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. But scientists at the University of Cambridge are taking a different approach to treating the disease by looking at an infection response pathway in human cells. The mechanism, called the...
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Science in a Minute: Some on Immunosuppressive Drugs May Not Fully Benefit from Covid Vaccines

Science in a Minute: Some on Immunosuppressive Drugs May Not Fully Benefit from Covid Vaccines. A new Michigan University Medical school study suggests that people whose immune systems are weakened by immunosuppressant drugs may be at a higher risk for serious Covid-19 symptoms and being hospitalized for the illness. The researchers also suggest that people taking immunosuppressive drugs may have a slower and weaker response to COVID vaccines and that some might not respond at all.
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New drug target found for future and current coronaviruses

Scientists are already preparing for a possible next coronavirus pandemic to strike, keeping with the seven-year pattern since 2004. In future-looking research, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine scientists have identified a novel target for a drug to treat SARS-CoV-2 that also could impact a new emerging coronavirus. "God forbid...