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MedicalXpress

Medication doesn't help kids with ADHD learn, study finds

For decades, most physicians, parents and teachers have believed that stimulant medications help children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) learn. However, in the first study of its kind, researchers at the Center for Children and Families at FIU found medication has no detectable impact on how much children with ADHD learn in the classroom.
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“Child safety isn’t a parenting choice, it’s a duty!”, Mother, who lost her baby after the boy choked to death during nap time at a day care centre, is warning other parents about child teething necklaces

The unfortunate mother, who lost her baby son after the boy reportedly choked on his necklace during nap time at a day care centre, is warning other parents about child teething necklaces. Danielle said that her son was found unconscious at the nursery after he had been strangled by a teething necklace while he was sleeping. He was found unresponsive and was taken to the hospital but doctors were unable to save him and the mother made the decision to turn off life support.
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psychologytoday.com

How a Narcissistic Co-Parent Manipulates Your Child

Children are hard-wired to protect their attachment relationships. A narcissistic co-parent who plays the victim automatically positions the other parent as the "bad guy." A narcissistic co-parent controls a child by giving love when the child does what he or she wants. A narcissistic co-parent influences a child in two...
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Slate

My Son’s School Is Treating Him Really Unfairly

Care and Feeding is Slate’s parenting advice column. Have a question for Care and Feeding? Submit it here or post it in the Slate Parenting Facebook group. For spring break my 16-year-old son Caden went on a multi-day class trip with an emphasis on swimming and water parks. Caden is on the autism spectrum and despite being a brilliant student has always struggled socially. But he’d been looking forward to this trip immensely, and as a single mom I sacrificed to ensure he could go and have a great time. I even bought him a GoPro so he could record his adventures. On the first day when they reached the very first swimming destination, several girls objected to Caden using his GoPro, claiming they didn’t want to be filmed in their swimsuits. Their boyfriends added pressure until finally the chaperones got involved and confiscated the GoPro. But according to Caden, two popular boys also wore GoPros for pretty much the entire trip. When I went to the school to retrieve the GoPro the teacher in charge would not confirm or deny this, but said in any case it wasn’t a problem because no one objected to these other boys using them. I’ve been discriminated against myself and it breaks my heart to see my son now being treated differently. I can’t get over feeling like the school system should refund me the cost of the GoPro, since Caden didn’t get to use it for its intended purpose, and preferably also pay some compensation for his disappointment and suffering. Should I pursue this, and how?
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psychologytoday.com

Possible Effects of Parental Violence on Kids

Verbal violence is speech intended to injure feelings and damage self-esteem. Physical violence is intended to inflict physical and emotional pain and assert dominance. The cost of violence is the loss of child trust in a primary relationship that now feels unloving, frightening, and unsafe. A reader asked: “Why are...

More on the kids featured in this week's 60 Minutes story on essential drug shortages

This Sunday, 60 Minutes reports on essential drug shortages that are affecting doctors, hospitals and patients daily. Two such patients are 8-year-old Mikah Carney and 18-year-old John Valenta, who were diagnosed with aggressive leukemia years ago. Their mothers, Sarah Carney and Cyndi Valenta, sat down with 60 Minutes correspondent Bill Whitaker, and shared their reactions when doctors and nurses told them that the life-saving cancer drug their children were taking, Vincristine, was no longer available to them due to shortages.
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10 best sensory toys to help with your little one’s development

Fun fact: a million new neural connections are made in the brain every second in our first few years of life. By the age of one, the all-controlling organ has doubled in size, meaning the foundations for future learning have already been laid.The concept of baby sensory play supports this crucial period of development to benefit their brains and bodies in the future.“Quality sensory toys are important for healthy intellectual and physical development, and they can help babies move on to the next developmental stage,” says Dr Lin Day, a parenting expert, author and founder of the popular Baby Sensory...
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