Immigration

RELATED CHANNELS
POTUSPosted by
Reuters

Week Ahead in Immigration: June 21, 2021

(Reuters) - Here are some upcoming events of interest to the immigration law community. Unless otherwise noted, all times are local, and court appearances are virtual due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Tuesday, June 22. 2:30 p.m. - A federal judge in Washington, D.C., will hold a status conference in a...
U.S. Politicsyourmileagemayvary.net

Good News/Bad News For Getting A Passport (Updated June, 2021)

The State Department updated its website the other day, and if you need to get a passport, there seems to be some good news and some bad news. I’ll start with the bad news. The time to get your passport appears to have increased considerably. In January 2020, it was 6-8 weeks and in April 2021 it was 10-12 weeks, the State Department’s website is now saying it could take upwards of 18 weeks from the day an application is submitted to the day a new passport is received.
RELATED PEOPLE
POTUSNew York Post

Biden changes immigration rules to open more pathways for migrants

The Biden administration this week changed immigration policies to allow children from Central American countries to fly to the US on taxpayers’ dime, and will allow migrants to seek asylum if they claim they are the victims of violence or crime — actions that come amid the backdrop of a record-smashing surge of migrants arriving at the border.
Manhattan, NYPosted by
Vogue Magazine

Manhattan District Attorney Candidate Tali Farhadian Weinstein Would Be the First Woman and Immigrant to Hold the Position

Before she was a Rhodes Scholar, a Supreme Court clerk for Sandra Day O’Connor, or counsel to Obama administration Attorney General Eric Holder, Tali Farhadian Weinstein was a nine year old girl piling into her parents’ wood-paneled station wagon. The Farhadians took weekend drives from their home in Old Tappan, New Jersey, as a form of free entertainment. On one such day trip, the family pulled up to Yale University and Fardhadian Weinstein remembers her mother, Farah, telling her: “You can go here if you want.”
RELATED CREATORS
POTUSPosted by
The Hill

Biden's plan for Central American kids is no substitute for asylum

On her recent trip to Guatemala and Mexico, Vice President Kamala Harris urged Central Americans to skip the journey to the U.S. border and apply for refuge from inside their home countries. She pointed to a forthcoming “resource center” that will ostensibly help refugees in the region do just this — echoing a line other senior administration officials have adopted in recent months. Instead of arriving at the southern U.S. border, as President Biden himself has asserted, Central Americans should seek forms of protection in the U.S. that are available from inside their home countries.
RELATED PUBLISHERS
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE
Texas StateFox News

Two soldiers charged with attempting to smuggle illegal immigrants into Texas

Two soldiers were arrested over the weekend and charged with attempting to smuggle two illegal immigrants into Texas, while wearing their uniforms. Emmanuel Oppongagyare and Ralph Gregory Saint-Joie approached the Hebbronville Border Patrol Checkpoint in a sedan blaring loud music on June 13 and told Border Patrol agents they were traveling to San Antonio from Zapata, Texas, according to a criminal complaint.
Congress & Courtsdaytimeconfidential.com

The View's Meghan McCain Thinks V.P. Harris "Sounded Like a Moron" on Immigration

Meghan McCain ripped into Vice President Kamala Harris on The View last week over her remarks on why she hadn't visited the U.S.-Mexico border yet. On the show, GOP Sen. Joni Ernst (Iowa) and comedian Michelle Buteau joined the panel. They were asked about Harris' trip to Latin America and her comments to NBC's Lester Holt when she was asked why she hasn't been to the border. Harris stated:
POTUSPosted by
Axios

Immigration's role in America's labor shortage

America's labor shortage crisis has been exacerbated by immigration restrictions that have reduced the number of both skilled and unskilled workers. Between the lines: Most of the labor scarcity blame has been aimed at expanded unemployment benefits, hard-to-find child care and low wages. But there is a fourth leg to the stool.