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Physician mistreatment emerges as crisis that can ripple through US health care

In a recent survey of more than 6,500 physicians from across the United States representing a broad spectrum of racial and ethnic diversity, nearly 30% of respondents reported experiencing discrimination and mistreatment from patients or patients' family members or visitors. Further, close to 20% of responding physicians had experiences in...
PUBLIC HEALTH
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BBC

Oakham Medical Practice shuts reception over staff abuse

A Rutland GP surgery has closed its front desk after staff members were subjected to "excessive abuse". Oakham Medical Practice closed its reception after patients aimed "verbal abuse and physical intimidation" at staff members, a spokesperson said. Patients will now use a digital service to register when at the surgery.
HEALTH
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Biden must force feckless WHO to hold Russia accountable for devastating Ukraine’s health facilities

Russia has attacked hundreds of Ukrainian health care facilities since it invaded unprovoked in February, yet it remains a World Health Organization executive-board member with full voting rights. Indeed, even as WHO documents assault after assault on Ukrainian hospitals and clinics, its reports notably avoid naming the country responsible. As the world gathers next week for WHO’s annual assembly, the Biden administration must reverse the agency’s fecklessness to hold Moscow accountable. In March, a Russian airstrike destroyed a maternity hospital in Ukraine’s heavily bombed Mariupol, wounding at least 17 people and killing a pregnant woman and her unborn child. Two or three survivors reportedly fled for safety to...
HEALTH
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BBC

Addenbrooke's Hospital breached duty of care over stroke patient

A hospital patient would have not suffered a "massive" stroke had she been given the correct clot reducing drug, a High Court judge ruled. The court found Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge breached its duty of care when staff treated Phoebe Pickering. Mr Justice Ritchie said she could have had a...
HEALTH

UnitedHealth CEO: Telehealth Lays Groundwork for Cost-Effective Care

Drafted into heavy service during COVID-19 lockdowns as office visits cratered and visit requests soared, then after a recent rough patch, telehealth is emerging as a key strategy to control healthcare costs and improve efficiencies for stakeholders. Hints of the magnitude of the change came late last year as the...
HEALTH
BBC

Care home manager struggling to compete with rising wages

A care home manager in Cornwall said rising wages in other sectors was leaving the home without enough staff. Peter Thomas, from Downes Care Home in Hayle, said the home cannot "compete" with tourism and hospitality sectors offering higher pay. Mr Thomas said the lack of staff meant it was...
GROCERY & SUPERMAKET
RELATED PEOPLE

Tim Dowling: free healthcare is always music to American ears – even slightly deaf ones

After an eight-month wait, NHS appointments, including an MRI, start coming at me fast. Who cares what date it is?. At the end of last summer I went to see the GP about my left ear: I wasn’t hearing very well out of it. The GP couldn’t see anything wrong, thanks to the bony protrusions lining my ear canal – the result, I understand, of regular cold water swimming as a child. I knew about those anyway; they don’t do much, apart from block the view.
HEALTH
POLITICO

Hospitals don’t need ‘surge capacity’

SEEKING BED REST — The latest wave of coronavirus doesn’t seem to be as bad as others we’ve endured. But people are still getting sick. And more are ending up in hospitals. So much for a restful spring and summer for our exhausted “health care heroes.”
HEALTH

Two in hospital after shoppers ‘collapse’ with breathing problems at Sainsbury’s supermarket

Two people have been taken to hospital after a “hazardous substances incident” at a Sainsbury’s supermarket.Five others were treated outside the store in the outskirts of Birmingham, which saw shoppers report breathing problems on Friday morning. More than 150 customers and staff were told to leave the Longbridge supermarket in response. Emergency services were called to the scene just before 10am on Friday.One witness told Birmingham Live: "The police have said there's been an incident involving some sort of gas. People were on the floor gasping for air after collapsing."West Midlands Police confirmed it dealt with an incident at...
PUBLIC HEALTH
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beckersasc.com

Outpatient primary care physician shortage could worsen as new internists opt for hospital employment

New internists are choosing to practice in hospitals over outpatient centers, making the outpatient physician shortage worse, according to a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine May 17. Researchers from the American Board of Internal Medicine, the Boston-based Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center department of medicine and the Center...
BOSTON, MA
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Healthcare IT News

AMA, Brigham and Women's, Joint Commission target equity, quality & safety

The American Medical Association this week, along with Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Joint Commission, announced the launch of a new learning network to help U.S. health systems approach their quality improvement and patient safety practices with health equity top of mind. WHY IT MATTERS. The goal of...
BOSTON, MA
marketplace.org

What’s with all the requests for reviews from health care providers?

We’re all used to businesses asking for reviews. And more and more medical providers are now among those urging us to rate our experiences. Dr. Mina Kim, the owner of Bryant Park Dental Associates, a dental practice in midtown Manhattan, took over the practice from her dad, who still works there. For most of his working life, word of mouth brought in new patients. As more and more patients search the web for a doctor or dentist, the more they rely on online reviews to help them make decisions.
HEALTH
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Hospitals ration CT scans, other procedures over shortage of contrast dye

Hospitals across the U.S. are being forced to ration medical scans and procedures after a lockdown in Shanghai hit a plant that produces a widely used contrast dye. The dye, made by General Electric, is used for a variety of purposes, many of them lifesaving. Typically injected into patients' veins, it provides higher contrast than imaging procedures like CT scans without dye. The increased contrast helps doctors more easily diagnose a brain bleed or clot, see how a heart or other organ is functioning or determine whether a tumor is growing or shrinking, among other things.
HEALTH
MedicalXpress

US hospitals are facing shortage of dye needed for life-saving scans

U.S. hospitals are running low on contrast dye injected into patients undergoing enhanced X-rays, CT scans and MRIs. The fluid, which makes the routine but potentially life-saving scans readable, helps doctors identify clots in the heart and brain. The shortage is expected to last until at least June 30, the American Hospital Association (AHA) says.
PUBLIC HEALTH
moneytalksnews.com

Report: Hospitals Performed 100,000 Unnecessary Procedures in 2020

U.S. hospitals performed more than 100,000 unnecessary procedures between March and December 2020, according to an analysis of Medicare claims data. The Lown Institute, a health care think tank, says these procedures were performed at a time when COVID-19 was raging and many public institutions were closed for business. In a press release, Dr. Vikas Saini, president of the Lown Institute, says:
HEALTH