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Frisco, TX COVID-19 Vaccines

Arkansas Online

Suit targets airline's vaccination rule

Eight United Airlines employees based at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport are suing the carrier over its vaccination mandate program, the most aggressive in the aviation industry. The employees filed the lawsuit in a North Texas federal court Wednesday, saying that the Chicago-based airline is not taking into account their religious...
DALLAS, TX
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starlocalmedia.com

City of Rowlett incentivizes vaccinations for city employees

The Rowlett City Council approved a vaccine incentive on Tuesday for active city employees through $500 bonuses. Human Resources Director Richard Jones said employees will have until Nov. 30 to receive their first vaccine. The bonus will come from American Rescue Plan Funds. “This is an incentive, not a mandate,”...
ROWLETT, TX
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wbap.com

Chris Krok Show: Are There Any Real Religious Reasons To Not Get Vaccinated?

Dr. Robert Jeffress, pastor at First Baptist Dallas, joins the show to take a look at religious exemptions for the COVID vaccine and if there’s any substance to them. Plus, if you boycott the vaccine for religious reasons, what else do you need to give up due to the same ingredients being used in many different scientific medicines? Dr. Jeffress and Chris break it all down on NewsTalk 820, WBAP!
DALLAS, TX
Dallas News

8 DFW-based airline employees sue United over vaccine mandates

Eight United Airlines employees based at DFW International Airport are suing the carrier over its vaccine mandate program, the most aggressive in the aviation industry. The employees filed the lawsuit in a North Texas federal court Wednesday, saying that the Chicago-based airline is not taking into account their religious beliefs because CEO Scott Kirby said few personal or religious exemptions would be granted.
DALLAS, TX
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Dallas Observer

Vaccine Mandate Leaves a Big Question for Restaurants and Bars: Who Pays?

Since President Joe Biden’s announcement that companies with more than 100 employees must require their workers to be vaccinated for COVID or test unvaccinated employees weekly, there have been more questions than answers. While the idea of ending the pandemic appeals to restaurateurs, particularly after the crushing effects on the industry over the past 18 months, no one seems happy about this new directive.
DALLAS, TX
Dallas News

Letters to the Editor - Lovesome Dove Cemetery, Biden’s tax plan, vaccine shots, golf coverage

Re: “Tradition overturned at Lonesome Dove Cemetery — Old-time board is ousted, plot fees go up, T-shirts for sale,” by Dave Lieber, Sunday Metro column. My heart goes out to Lieber and the attendees at the annual meeting of the Lonesome Dove Cemetery Association in Southlake who were against the proposed big changes. The Rev. Jason Stover of Lonesome Dove Baptist Church reflects the social attitude of today that money is more important than tradition and people.
Dallas News

When must North Texas employees get COVID-19 vaccinations? Deadlines for hospitals, other companies

A slow trickle of North Texas companies announced COVID-19 vaccine mandates over the last few months, and the deadlines for employees to get jabbed are rapidly approaching. Only 8% of companies surveyed by the Dallas Regional Chamber in early August are requiring vaccines for employees to return to office, although that number will likely increase following a federal vaccine mandate for private employers with 100 or more workers announced Sept. 9.
TEXAS STATE
CW33 NewsFix

Pfizer touts COVID vaccine for ages 5-11

Texas OB-GYN challenges abortion law, says he performed one after 6 weeks. Gabby Petito timeline: Remains found in Wyoming fit description of missing 22-year-old Sponsored Content: Macy's Backstage location to open in Frisco. Sponsored Content: Fashion Friday - matchy matchy. New study shows how much free time you need to...
DALLAS, TX
Dallas News

Here’s what to know about Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine and kids ages 5 to 11

This story has been updated to include comments from public health experts and North Texas parents. The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine has been shown to work for children ages 5 to 11, the company announced Monday. The vaccine, made by Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech, is currently available for anyone 12 and older. Here’s what to know about this new development in fighting COVID.
DALLAS, TX
Dallas News

Letters to the Editor — COVID vaccines bring out the arguments

As we watched the commemoration of the 20th anniversary of 9/11 and the deaths of nearly 3,000 Americans, the governor of Texas and several other “red” states seem willing to accept the deaths of more than 600,000 Americans and 50,000 Texans as they challenge any acceptable public health measure to stop the attack of the COVID-19 virus on Americans and Texans.
DALLAS, TX

Jeffress: 'No credible religious argument' against coronavirus vaccines

The Rev. Robert Jeffress of First Baptist Dallas said this week that "there is no credible religious argument" against receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. Jeffress, an ardent supporter of former President Trump , told The Associated Press in an interview that he and his staff at First Baptist Dallas “are neither offering nor encouraging members to seek religious exemptions from the vaccine mandates.”
DALLAS, TX
Dallas News

First Baptist’s Robert Jeffress: ‘There is no credible religious argument against the vaccines’

As Americans increasingly seek religious exemptions from COVID-19 vaccine mandates, many faith leaders are telling them no. With more employers imposing the mandates, the push for exemptions has become more heated. At issue for many whose faith leads them to oppose abortion is that the most widely used coronavirus vaccines were tested on fetal cell lines developed over decades in laboratories, though the vaccines themselves do not contain any such material.
DALLAS, TX
dmagazine.com

Employers Are Making the Vaccine Mandates About Safety, Not Politics

A publicly traded oil company with rigs throughout West Texas has 2,000 workers spread between 42 sites. The workers often work, eat, and sleep together in tight quarters. Earlier this summer, the company recorded 23 COVID-19 infections in three days, requiring 60 employees to go home and quarantine. Because of the nature of their job, they can’t work remotely. “We can’t live like this,” the CEO told Dr. Scott Conard. “We can’t have our operations cease because people are not willing to get a vaccine.”
DALLAS, TX