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Texas Prison Detaining Immigrants Under Gov. Abbott

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. As part of Republican Gov. Greg Abbott’s plan for tighter border security, a Texas prison began detaining immigrants accused of state crimes after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. On Wednesday, the Texas State Department of Criminals said Val Verde County already sent three people arrested under Abbott’s orders to the Briscoe Unit. According to the Val Verde County sheriff’s office, the Briscoe detainees were arrested for criminal trespassing. The Val Verde County attorney predicted it was arresting 50 immigrants per day. Abbott has sent about 1,000 Texas Department of Public Safety officers to every county on or near the southern border. The Texas Tribune.
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Biden Administration Afraid of Lifting COVID-19 Border Restrictions

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. According to two U.S. officials familiar with internal discussions, Biden administration officials are worried that lifting COVID-19 restrictions will lead more migrants to cross the U.S.-Mexico border. The officials said there is concern that if more migrants are allowed to enter the U.S. to attend their immigration court cases, others may try to make the journey, which would overwhelm the system. Immigrant advocacy groups on the other hand criticized the Biden administration for continuing to stop migrants from crossing. “Vaccines are readily available and effective against new variants of Covid. The country is opening back up. So, too, should our borders be open for people seeking asylum,” said Noah Gottschalk, global policy lead for Oxfam America. NBC News.
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Sculptor Uses Chinese Immigrant Communities as Inspiration

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. Anne Wu, an emerging sculptor and installation artist, uses her creations to reflect the material culture and experience of Chinese immigrant communities. Her latest display, A Patterned Universe, features architectural materials from her immigrant neighborhood in Flushing, Queens. Wu traveled to four Chinatowns in the U.S. to search for examples of shared cultural imagery, finding that each had its own unique backstory, whether it was built by tourists or actual Chinese communities. Wu’s exhibit based on her findings is on display at The Shed in New York City through August 1. Art in America.
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Guatemalans Continue to Struggle After Hurricanes and Border Crossings

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. Sisters Miriam Noemi Cuc Cac and Irma Cuc Cac tried to cross the U.S.-Mexico border back in December 2019, but were apprehended by Mexican law enforcement and sent home. But there wasn’t much to return to, as the family lost their crops to last year’s hurricanes and expect more crop failure this year. They’re going to attempt to cross another time because, as Miriam said, “We want to better ourselves. And there’s no way to make money here.” According to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection figures, Guatemalan migrants were apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border over 153,000 times this year, and experts say climate displacement could drive even more Central Americans north. Politico Magazine.
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Biden Could Lift COVID-19 Border Restrictions

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. The Biden administration is reevaluating lifting COVID-19 restrictions that barred over 750,000 migrants from seeking asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border since October. According to sources familiar with the deliberations, the White House and the Department of Homeland Security were considering terminating the public health order rapidly expelling migrants on July 31. But as of Tuesday, those plans were in flux and the White House hadn’t sent plans to U.S. Customs and Border Protection detailing how to eliminate the order. Immigrant advocates say the order has put migrants in danger, causing many to stay in dangerous conditions in Mexico. CNN and NBC News.
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Young Immigrants’ Future in Peril Amid DACA Renewal Delays

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. Michelle, a 35-year-old New York City resident and new mother, applied to renew her Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program status in February — months before it was due. She has been renewing her status carefully every two years since 2014. But in May, Michelle’s DACA status expired with no sign of renewal, stripping her ability to live and work in the U.S. Even though Michelle’s maternity leave will end this week, she can’t legally return to work, and could be deported if she tries to do so. Michelle’s story is an example of the drastic short-term and long-term consequences DACA application processing delays can have. U.S. News & World Report.
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Activists Block Entrance to a DHS Office in Newark to Delay Transfers and Deportations

Dozens of activists blocked entrances to a Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) field office, the investigative arm of DHS, in Newark on Tuesday to protest the transfers and deportations of detained immigrants in New Jersey. The field DHS office looks to be the last stop before individuals are deported or transferred, according to activists who have been tracking the movements of detained immigrants. Demonstrators attempted to halt those processes completely on Tuesday.
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New York Groups Decry DACA Suspension

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. On Friday, a federal judge in Texas ordered the suspension of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, halting the approval of new applications. This decision led advocates to once again call for a permanent solution to provide safety for undocumented immigrants. Murad Awawdeh, executive director of the New York Immigration Coalition, said in a statement that the ruling “makes it crystal clear that Washington can’t keep playing with politics with the lives of these New Yorkers and the hundreds of thousands like them across the country.” Jose Loez, co-executive director of the Make the Road New York, said now is the time to design a pathway to U.S. citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Gothamist.
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Texas Judge Suspends DACA Applications but White House Appeals

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. U.S. District Court Judge Andrew Hanen of Houston ruled last week that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which protects hundreds of thousands young undocumented immigrants from deportation, is unlawful and suspended new applications. Hanen wrote that current recipients wouldn’t be affected and that the federal government shouldn’t “take any immigration, deportation or criminal action” against them that it “would not otherwise take.” The Department of Homeland Security can receive new applications but is briefly prohibited from approving them. Hanen ruled that the creation of DACA was a violation of the Administrative Procedure Act. “DHS failed to engage in the statutorily mandated process,” he wrote, “so DACA never gained status as a legally binding policy that could impose duties or obligations.” The New York Times.
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Unaccompanied Migrant Children Exempted from Deportation

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ordered unaccompanied migrant children to be exempt from the U.S.’s ban on accepting asylum-seeking migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. The total asylum ban was originally issued in October by the Trump administration, citing concerns over COVID-19’s spread in the U.S. But with vaccination rates increasing, the changes suggest the Biden administration will consider removing the asylum ban. A Justice Department attorney hinted at the CDC change during a court hearing on Tuesday in Fort Worth, which was part of a lawsuit from Texas to uphold the Trump ban. The Associated Press.
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ICE Nominee Promises ‘Rule of Law’ in Confirmation Hearing

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. President Biden’s nominee to run Immigration and Customs Enforcement promised to maintain the “rule of law” and to improve public safety during his Senate confirmation hearing. Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez of Texas also said he wouldn’t terminate the voluntary 278(g) program that allows law enforcement to collaborate with federal deportation efforts. The grandson of immigrants went on to praise the role migrants played in the U.S.’s history over the years. “We have proven that people from varied backgrounds cannot just coexist, but rally around common values and a shared dream of always doing better,” he said at his confirmation hearing. Gonzalez noted that he has an “amicable” relationship with ICE and that the agency should prioritize the arrest of recent border crossers and serious criminals. The American Civil Liberties Union referred to his testimony as “deeply disappointing.” The Washington Post.
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New York City Immigrants May Be Eligible to Vote Soon

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. A bill allowing noncitizens in New York City to vote in local elections seems to finally have legs. Activists have been fighting for noncitizens to vote since 2005 and lawmakers attempted in 2009 and 2013 to make that a reality, but they’ve never had enough political momentum. In June, the latest version of the bill received its 34th co-sponsor, giving it a supermajority on the 51-member council. The legislation would only apply to 900,000 New Yorkers who are permanent residents and have work authorizations. Since the bill has supermajority support, it’s guaranteed a public hearing within 60 days. Activists say they’re working on getting an official day. The Intercept.
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Corky Lee Remains on Chinatown’s Mind

There seemed to be endless ways one could refer to Corky Lee. There was ”the ABC (American Born Chinese) from NYC,” or the “Gordon Parks for the radical Asian American set,” and of course, the now iconic “Undisputed, Unofficial Asian American Photographer Laureate” which he had printed on personal business cards. But however eccentric, none could ever be considered a misnomer, only a testimony to Lee’s pervasive influence —a tenant organizer, a photojournalist, a community activist, a neighbor, a friend.
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DACA Recipients Lose Work Permits

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. Ju Hong is among thousands of people trying to obtain a work permit while also seeking to renew his protection under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. He’s been a DACA recipient since 2012, but his work permit expires in early July even though he applied for a renewal. Hong received a call from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services saying his DACA status was renewed, but he’s still waiting for his work permit. According to USCIS correspondence, about 13,000 DACA renewal cases were pending for more than four months, despite the agency recently informing Congress that most DACA renewal cases were completed quicker than that. CNN.
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What Sanctuary Policies Mean for Undocumented Immigrants

-> This article is part of Documented’s Glossary. We want to make it easier to understand the U.S. immigration system. If you want to know more about different visa types and immigration terms,. please check our library here. -> To find useful information for immigrants, such as where to find...
Bronx, NYPosted by
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Street Vendors Protest Exorbitant Fines as City Reopens

On Thursday, street vendors, organizers and elected officials marched down Fordham Road in the Bronx to demand a moratorium on the thousands of dollars in fines street vendors have received for operating without a permit or license. The march, attended by 60 street vendors from the Bronx, took place on...
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Report: Immigrants With Ankle Monitors Suffer Harsh Effects

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. Immigrants who are forced to wear electronic ankle monitors suffer emotional, mental and physical tolls that cause them to have difficulty sleeping, mental health problems, problems at work and suicidal thoughts, according to a new report. The Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Freedom For Immigrants and the Immigrant Defense Project conducted interviews with immigrants under surveillance. Of those interviewed, 12 percent said they considered suicide and 88 percent said they had issues with mental health, sleeping, migraines and depression. As politicians call to end immigration detention, the Biden administration is looking to boost funding and participation in Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Intensive Supervision Assistance Program. The Guardian.
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DHS Funding Package Includes Immigrant Surveillance

This summary was featured in Documented’s Early Arrival newsletter. You can subscribe to receive it in your inbox three times per week here. The House Appropriations Committee has advanced a Homeland Security budget package that includes funding for technologies to surveil immigrants. The proposal, passed through the Democratic-controlled committee, would designate $475 million to ICE for the agency’s Alternatives To Detention program. That’s more than what the Biden administration requested for DHS’s 2022 budget. The program has received criticism for expanding the number of immigrants in ICE supervision. Critics also said the supervision caused them physical and emotional harm. The Biden administration claims ATD helps end detention and calls for the program to cover 140,000 individuals for the 2022 budget request. The Hill.