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Climate Change

Study connects climate hazards to 58% of infectious diseases

Climate hazards such as flooding, heat waves and drought have worsened more than half of the hundreds of known infectious diseases in people, including malaria, hantavirus, cholera and anthrax, a study says. Researchers looked through the medical literature of established cases of illnesses and found that 218 out of the...
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More than half of diseases including Zika and cholera are made worse by climate crisis

In 2016, a community in a remote corner of northern Siberia started to get sick.Dozens of people, and thousands of reindeer, had developed anthrax, a bacterial disease that can cause fever, swelling and vomiting. One child died, as well as at least 2,000 reindeer.The cause is believed to be the climate crisis.Scientists think that extraordinarily high temperatures that summer thawed out a frozen reindeer carcass that died from anthrax decades before – releasing dormant spores back into the air with tragic consequences.It’s not the only time the climate crisis may have gotten people sick. A new study found that...
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Phys.org

Climate deniers use past heat records to sow doubt online

With Europe gripped by successive heatwaves, climate-change deniers are spreading skepticism by publishing data on social media on extreme temperatures allegedly recorded decades ago to imply scientists are exaggerating global warming. But experts say the figures cited from the past are often incorrect or taken out of context—and even if...

‘No evidence’ to support claim we’re in climate emergency, ex-minister Lord Frost claims

There’s no evidence to support claims that we are living through a climate emergency, a former cabinet minister and Liz Truss supporter has claimed.Writing in a paper for the think tank Policy Exchange. former Brexit Minister David Frost described wind power as “medieval technology” and said people should not be asked to “up-end the whole way our societies work” in order to tackle climate change.While he acknowledged that the effects of global heating are a problem, he said it should be tackled in a “pragmatic way” by focusing on technological solutions to get more energy in a carbon-efficient way, rather...
Phys.org

Chances of climate catastrophe are ignored, scientists say

Experts are ignoring the worst possible climate change catastrophic scenarios, including collapse of society or the potential extinction of humans, however unlikely, a group of top scientists claim. Eleven scientists from around the world are calling on the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the world's authoritative climate science...
natureworldnews.com

Climate Change: Hot Night Events Likely to Increase Mortality Rate by Up to 60% by the End of the Century

Hot night events due to climate change have been an emerging phenomenon. It is a term used that pertains to the unusual high temperatures in certain locations during evening hours. The so-called night-time warming have led to increasing concern amongst the scientific community, including climate scientists and authorities in other concerned fields.
KANSAS STATE
CBS News

Climate change: Preparing for a worst-case scenario

Extreme weather events continue to ravage the planet. Many point to climate change as the cause. And it's why a team of international scientists says the world needs to start preparing for the possibility of a climate endgame.

"Terrifying" study links climate hazards to hundreds of infectious diseases

Climate hazards such as flooding, heat waves and drought have worsened more than half of the hundreds of known infectious diseases in people, including malaria, hantavirus, cholera and anthrax, a study says.Researchers looked through the medical literature of established cases of illnesses and found that 218 out of the known 375 human infectious diseases, or 58%, seemed to be made worse by one of 10 types of extreme weather connected to climate change, according to a study published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change.Doctors, going back to Hippocrates, have long connected disease to weather, but this study shows how widespread...

Spain battles northwest wildfires

Spanish firefighters on Saturday struggled to contain wildfires that have ravaged large tracts in the northwest, as a third summer heat wave grips the country. They have eased since, but were expected to remain around 35C across much of the country on Saturday.
studyfinds.org

Hot nights caused by climate change will likely send death toll soaring this century

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — If you’ve been sweating through your bedsheets more often, you’re not alone. Nighttime temperatures all over the world have been excessively hot this summer, and this climate change-provoked trend shows no signs of cooling off. Even worse, scientists at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill predict that hot and sticky evenings will increase the mortality rate around the world by up to 60 percent by the end of the century.
CHAPEL HILL, NC
natureworldnews.com

Climate Change can Cause Outbreaks and Pathogenic Diseases in Humans, New Review Says

As shown in an assessment report, global warming could induce communicable diseases and epidemics in people in over a hundred distinct manners. Scientists from the State of Hawaii at Manoa and the College of Wisconsin in the United States examined the material on 375 human illnesses. They discovered that half of these infections were exacerbated by climatic risks at a certain period in ancient times.
HAWAII STATE
MedicalXpress

Risk of death rises as climate change causes nighttime temperatures to climb

Excessively hot nights caused by climate change are predicted to increase the mortality rate around the world by up to 60% by the end of the century, according to a new international study that features research from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. Ambient heat during the night...
Phys.org

Changing lifestyles in response to the effects of climate change

Consumers should be adapting their behavior in a bid to save water during the ongoing dry weather, according to Cranfield University academics. Limiting the length of a shower or the amount of bathwater, not leaving taps running, and installing water saving devices (which many water companies offer for free) are all effective ways to make a difference.